Mentoring Workshop Series

These workshops are free and open to all OSU faculty and graduate students.


Establishing a Good Relationship and Designing a Project

Workshop participants will analyze their perceptions of the research mentoring relation-ship, prepare to become effective mentors, and identify aspects of quality research projects for undergraduates.

Optional Reading:

  • In asking, "What is a Mentor?"  the authors seek to define this unque role in Advisor, Teacher, Role Model, Friend. National Academy Press, 1997.
  • Arguing that "we should train graduate students to be educators as well as researchers," Jo Handelsman advocates for Teaching Scientists to Teach" in "HHMI Bulletin, June 2003," Entering Mentoring, 2005.

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Establishing Expectations and Maintaining Effective Communication

A critical element of effective mentor-mentee relationships is a mutual understanding of what each person expects of the other, which often changes over time, and such under-standing is dependent on quality communication. Workshop participants will explore how to establish expectations and learning objectives while clearly communicating with undergraduates.

Optional Reading:

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Elements of Effective Mentoring

Though everyone approaches mentoring differently, there are some common themes that most mentoring philosophies share. Workshop participants will discuss what has proven effective in their own mentoring while exploring what they can learn from other mentors. Participants will begin developing their own mentoring philosophies.

Optional Reading:

  • In "Nature's Guide for Mentors" Adrian Lee, Carina Dennis, and Philip Campbell asser that "having a good mentor early in your career can mean the difference between success and failure in any
    field" (Nature, 2007).

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Mentoring Challenges and Solutions

Workshop participants will discuss the challenges they have encountered as mentors and explore solutions.

Optional Reading:

  • In “Mentoring Learned, Not Taught – Identifying Challenges” (2005) Jo Handelsman et al. observe that “after we have worked with a student for a few weeks or months, we may begin to see performance issues that didn’t emerge immediately” and offer “some questions for reflection and sample situations to provoke thought about dealing with these very complex, very human mentoring challenges” (53).  

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Dealing with Ethics: RCR, IRB, IACUC and Beyond

Workshop participants will discuss the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR), Institutional Review Board (IRB), scientific misconduct, and conflict of interest among other ethics considerations.
 
Optional Reading:

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Assessing Understanding and Fostering Independence

Mentors strive to foster the independence of their student mentees, but it is often difficult to know how much direction to provide and when it is appropriate to do so.  Workshop participants will explore strategies of assessing understanding and balancing oversight with independence.

Optional Reading:

  • In the “Benefits of Undergraduate Research Experiences” (2007) Susan H. Russell et al. argue that “no formulaic combination of activities optimizes undergraduate research experiences, nor should providers structure their programs differently for unique racial/ethnic minorities or women; rather, it seems the inculcation of enthusiasm is the key element—and the earlier the better” (549).
  • In “Mentoring Undergraduates” (On Being a Mentor, 2007) W. Brad Johnson considers “the prevalence of mentoring in college, reviews some of the key developmental models bearing on young adulthood, and summarizes some of the salient mentor functions required of the effective college student mentor” (119).

 

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Mentoring Workshop Series
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Free and Open to All OSU Faculty and Graduate Students
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Mentoring Workshop Series