Oklahoma State University

Welcome

The Henry Bellmon Office of Scholar Development and Undergraduate Research has long been a national leader and innovator in scholar development and, more recently, undergraduate research. For over 25 years, our office has prepared students for the future, whether in competition for prestigious national/international fellowships, admission to top graduate schools, securing highly competitive jobs, or attaining the skills required to grow as a leader. The past has taught us that diverse programs, targeted to a wide range of majors, year classifications, and interests, has been the most successful way to elevate a large number of students’ educational experience. 

OSU’s commitment to highly motivated students has been nothing short of phenomenal. Our office has prepared and supported 72 major fellowship winners, 1,471 Wentz Research Scholars, 778 Freshman Research Scholars, 3,334 Wentz Leadership Scholars, 625 Wentz Music Scholars, and nearly $1,000,000 worth of other scholarship support, totaling over $19 million in awards.

Our office enhances undergraduate opportunity, encourages student-faculty mentoring, and promotes retention through scholarship/fellowship success, undergraduate research, international experience, and individual/institutional recognition. We hope you will join our team, as student, faculty or supporter, in broadening OSU’s reputation as a top school for scholars who develop their academic abilities in exceptional ways, increasing the national visibility of our students, university, and state. 

2015 Cowboys in Cambridge Application Available





Scholar Development invites applicants for the 2015 “Cowboys in Cambridge” summer program at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge, UK. The program involves two weeks of study on a course prepared by OSU’s top faculty, with completion of the course project in mid-October for fall semester honors (if applicable) or general credit (3 hours). This year’s course is “Discovering Dickens’s England: Travels with the Nicklebys” (ENGL 3200/HONR3000) taught by Dr. Jeffrey Walker, Professor of English. Undergraduates in all majors are encouraged to apply for this unique course, which is designed to help students not only enjoy Nicholas Nickleby, one of literature’s greatest comic novels, but also investigate the educational, legal, political, economic, social, and historical problems that beset Dickens’s England in the 1830s—problems that continue to exist here and everywhere almost two centuries later. Successful applicants will participate in a thorough orientation and be assigned readings for study in May and June to prepare for a journey through Dickens’s England.


Scholar Abroad | Trinidad and Tobago, June 2015





Scholar Development invites applicants for Scholar Abroad "Island Life: A Literary and Cultural Survey of the Caribbean" (ENGL 4400 - H) in Trinidad and Tobago (June 2015). Taught at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine campus, this program will investigate the literary and cultural history of the Caribbean Islands. Topics of interest include colonization and decolonization, natural resources and environment, and traditional and contemporary forms of artistic expression. Students will also visit historical sites and experience contemporary life in the Caribbean through numerous excursions. Readings for the course will include early explorer and settler accounts, such as Columbus’ letters (1492) and Richard Ligon’s A History of Barbados (1657); nineteenth-century novels like Cynric Williams’s Hamel, the Obeah Man (1827) and The History of Three-Fingered Jack (1840); and 20th century and contemporary literature, like V.S. Naipaul’s A House for Mr. Biswas (1961), Jean Rhys’s, Wide Sargasso Sea (1966), and selections from The Oxford Collection of Caribbean Short Stories (20th Century).

Trinidad and Tobago Application/Info. Sheet

News


Chacey Schoeppel Named 2014 Truman Scholar
 
 

Chacey Schoeppel 

Qualities of Successful Scholars


  • Honors College enrollment is recommended, but not required
  • Good grades (at least a 3.7 GPA is recommended)
  • Impressive speaking and writing skills
  • Leadership roles in campus and community
  • Diverse academic interests (preferably a double major or multiple minors)
  • Interested in and conversant about the Humanities (regardless of major)
  • Passion for public service and intellectual discourse
  • Extensive personal reading habits beyond course work (including reputable national newspapers, influential periodicals (other than Time/Newsweek), and classics of fiction and non-fiction)

If you have these qualities and are interested in challenging yourself, we invite you to browse this site to learn more and to stop by our office in 334 Student Union to discuss the scholar development process and opportunities available.


Bright students with energy and integrity will find enthusiastic faculty mentors to guide them, wholehearted support from alumni, individualized mentoring and multiple opportunities through the Scholar Development office.